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LLM in Legal Practice

  • Oxford Brookes University
  • Responsable(s) de la formation : Mark O'Brien
  • Adresse : Headington Campus Gipsy Ln, Oxford OX3 0BP, Royaume-Uni, Oxford
  • Téléphone : +44 (0) 1865 484931
  • Email administratif : law@brookes.ac.uk
  • Site Internet : Consulter

Application

Students will normally be required to have (or to be expecting) a first or upper second class honours degree, or an equivalent degree awarded by a university outside the United Kingdom. The degree may be in law or in a related discipline. We welcome applications from both law and non-law graduates. Students new to the academic study of law will be advised to read a number of recommended texts by way of induction before they begin the course. Students are also encouraged to attend the induction sessions provided in the week prior to the beginning of the course.

Application

Students will normally be required to have (or to be expecting) a first or upper second class honours degree, or an equivalent degree awarded by a university outside the United Kingdom. The degree may be in law or in a related discipline. We welcome applications from both law and non-law graduates. Students new to the academic study of law will be advised to read a number of recommended texts by way of induction before they begin the course. Students are also encouraged to attend the induction sessions provided in the week prior to the beginning of the course.

Curriculum

The programme has three component parts:


Part one consists of the completion of a recognised professional course which prepares the applicant for a legal career in common law jurisdiction.  


Part two consists of a one-week course in Advanced Legal Research Methods. The course is taught in mid June and in 2015 commences on 15th June. Traditional lectures and seminars take place during the first week  when its necessary to be resident in Oxford. Students may wish to stay in Oxford for the second week  to use the Universities' libraries. Part two culminates with the submission of a detailed written research proposal of up to 2,000 words by 30 September.


Part three consists of researching and writing a dissertation of up to 12,000 words on the agreed area of legal practice set out in the research project. This element may be taken entirely through distance learning.


NB As courses are reviewed regularly, details may vary from that shown here.


Teaching and Learning


Academic legal research forms a significant part of the LL.M in Legal Practice. The research methods course will be taught in seminars and workshops. It involves studying the main academic research methodologies including doctrinal, comparative, historical and socio-legal methods.


Following the course, students submit a formal 2,000 word research proposal. Research for the dissertation is then carried out in part-time mode over 12 months. Supervision and group discussions will be provided to support students through the writing of their dissertations. Part 3 (dissertation) may be taken either through distance learning or through face to face supervision.


All students have an academic supervisor who is a member of the Law School. We endeavour to match student research interest with supervisor expertise and so we ask that students give a brief initial indication of their research interest in the personal statement section of their application. Students can meet/communicate with their supervisor either in Oxford or via email or Skype.

Curriculum

The programme has three component parts:


Part one consists of the completion of a recognised professional course which prepares the applicant for a legal career in common law jurisdiction.  


Part two consists of a one-week course in Advanced Legal Research Methods. The course is taught in mid June and in 2015 commences on 15th June. Traditional lectures and seminars take place during the first week  when its necessary to be resident in Oxford. Students may wish to stay in Oxford for the second week  to use the Universities' libraries. Part two culminates with the submission of a detailed written research proposal of up to 2,000 words by 30 September.


Part three consists of researching and writing a dissertation of up to 12,000 words on the agreed area of legal practice set out in the research project. This element may be taken entirely through distance learning.


NB As courses are reviewed regularly, details may vary from that shown here.


Teaching and Learning


Academic legal research forms a significant part of the LL.M in Legal Practice. The research methods course will be taught in seminars and workshops. It involves studying the main academic research methodologies including doctrinal, comparative, historical and socio-legal methods.


Following the course, students submit a formal 2,000 word research proposal. Research for the dissertation is then carried out in part-time mode over 12 months. Supervision and group discussions will be provided to support students through the writing of their dissertations. Part 3 (dissertation) may be taken either through distance learning or through face to face supervision.


All students have an academic supervisor who is a member of the Law School. We endeavour to match student research interest with supervisor expertise and so we ask that students give a brief initial indication of their research interest in the personal statement section of their application. Students can meet/communicate with their supervisor either in Oxford or via email or Skype.